The Minor Planet Bulletin
BULLETIN OF THE MINOR PLANETS SECTION OF THE ASSOCIATION OF LUNAR AND PLANETARY OBSERVERS


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The Minor Planet Bulletin is the journal for almost all amateurs and even some professionals for publishing asteroid photometry results, including lightcurves, H-G parameters, color indexes, and shape/spin axis models. It is considered to be a refereed journal by the SAO/NASA ADS. All MPB papers are indexed in the ADS.

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Please send a check, drawn on a U.S. bank and payable in U.S. funds, to "Minor Planet Bulletin" and send it to:

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Minor Planet Bulletin
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Issue 38-4 (2011 Oct-Dec)
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The Lightcurve Analysis of Five Asteroids
Pages 179-180
Li, Bin; Zhao, Haibin; Yao, Jingshen
2011MPBu...38..179L    Download PDF

Photometric data for five asteroids were collected at the Xuyi Observatory: 121 Hermione, 620 Drakonia, 877 Walkure, 933 Susi, and 2903 Zhuhai. A new period of 5.27 h is reported for 2903 Zhuhai.

Period Determination for 819 Barnardiana
Pages 180-181
Alvarez, Eduardo Manuel
2011MPBu...38..180A    Download PDF

Lightcurve analysis for 819 Barnardiana was performed from observations during its 2011 opposition. The synodic rotation period was found to be 66.70 ± 0.01 h and the lightcurve amplitude was 0.82 ± 0.06 mag.

Photometry of Asteroid 13241 Biyo
Pages 181-182
Albanesi, Raniero; Calabresi, Massimo; Haver, Roberto
2011MPBu...38..181A    Download PDF

Asteroid 13241 Biyo was observed at Virginio Cesarini Observatory (Italy) on 1 night in March 2011. The resulting lightcurve shows a synodic period of 2.199 ± 0.219 h and amplitude 0.99 ±0.03 mag. in the R band.

The Long Period of 2675 Tolkien
Pages 182-183
Durkee, Russell I.; Brinsfield, James W.; Hornoch, Kamil; Kusnirak, Petr
2011MPBu...38..182D    Download PDF

Lightcurve measurements of 2675 Tolkien from the Shed of Science, Via Capote Observatory, and Ondrejov Observatory were taken on twenty-three nights; a period of P = 1058 ± 30 hrs, A = 0.75 ± 0.1 mag were derived.

Rotation Period Determinations for 11 Parthenope, 38 Leda, 111 Ate 194 Prokne, 217 Eudora, and 224 Oceana
Pages 183-185
Pilcher, Frederick
2011MPBu...38..183P    Download PDF

Synodic rotation periods and amplitudes have been found for these asteroids: 11 Parthenope 13.722 ± 0.001 h, 0.10 ± 0.02 mag with 3 maxima and minima per cycle; 38 Leda 12.834 ± 0.001 h, 0.15 ± 0.01 mag; 99 Dike 18.127 ± 0.002 h, 0.22 ± 0.02 mag; 111 Ate 22.072 ± 0.001 h, 0.12 ± 0.01 mag with an irregular lightcurve; 194 Prokne 15.679 ± 0.001 h, 0.16 ± 0.02 mag; 217 Eudroa 25.253 ± 0.002 h, 0.22 ± 0.04 mag; 224 Oceana 9.401 ± 0.001 h, 0.09 ± 0.01 mag. An alternative 18.8 hour period suggested for 224 Oceana is definitively rejected.

Lightcurve Analysis of 45073 Doyanrose
Pages 186
Ruthroff, John C.
2011MPBu...38..186R    Download PDF

CCD observations made of main-belt asteroid 45073 Doyanrose during 2011 January led to a lightcurve with a synodic period of 3.16 h ± 0.01 and amplitude of 0.16 ± 0.04 mag.

Asteroid Lightcurves from the Preston Gott and McDonald Observatories
Pages 187-189
Clark, Maurice
2011MPBu...38..187C    Download PDF

Asteroid period and amplitude results obtained at the Preston Gott Observatory and at the McDonald Observatory are presented.

Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory: 2011 March - July
Pages 190-195
Warner, Brian D.
2011MPBu...38..190W    Download PDF

Lightcurves for 24 asteroids were obtained at the Palmer Divide Observatory (PDO) from 2011 March to July: 1355 Magoeba, 1727 Mette, 2048 Dwornik, 3022 Dobermann, (5639) 1989 PE, 6296 Cleveland, 6310 Jankonke, (6394) 1990 QM2, 6435 Daveross, 6859 Datemasamune, 10159 Tokara, (29242) 1992 HB4, (33324) 1998 QE56, (33679) 1999 JY107, (38047) 1998 TC3, (38048) 1998 UL18, (41424) 2000 CK40, (55854) 1996 VS1, (57784) 2001 VW85, (60335) 2000 AR42, (95147) 2002 AP166, (96327) 1997 EJ50, (97649) 2000 FK1, and (104998) 2000 KT2.

Photometric Observations and Analysis of 604 Tekmessa
Pages 195-197
Baker, Ronald E.; Warner, Brian D.
2011MPBu...38..195B    Download PDF

CCD observations of the main-belt asteroid 604 Tekmessa were recorded during the period 2010 September to December. Analysis of the lightcurve found a synodic period of P = 5.5596 ± 0.0001 h and amplitude A = 0.49 ± 0.01 mag. The phase curve referenced to mean magnitude suggests the absolute magnitude and phase slope parameter H = 9.435 ± 0.014 and G = 0.112 ± 0.013. The phase curve referenced to maximum light suggests H = 9.279 ± 0.018 and G = 0.165 ± 0.017.

Lightcurves and Spin Periods from the Wise Observatory - 2011
Pages 198-199
Polishook, David
2011MPBu...38..198P    Download PDF

We consider as targets of opportunity the random asteroids traveling through the field of view of Wise Observatory's telescopes while observing other asteroids. We report here the lightcurves and period analysis of those asteroids with results that we determine to be the most secure.

Several Well-observed Asteroidal Occultations in 2010
Pages 200-204
Timerson, Brad; Durech, J.; Abramson, H.; Brooks, J.; Caton, D.; Clark, D.; Conard, S.; Cooke, B.; Dunham, D. W.; Dunham, J.; Edberg, S.; Ellington, C.; Faircloth, J.; Herchak, S.; Iverson, E.; Jones, R.; Lucas, G.; Lyzenga, G.; Maley, P.; Martinez, L.; Menke, J.; Mroz, G.; Nolan, P.; Peterson, R.; Preston, S.; Rattley, G.; Ray, J.; Scheck, A.; Stamm, J.; Stanton, R.; Suggs, R.; Tatum, R.; Thomas, W.
2011MPBu...38..200T    Download PDF

During 2010 IOTA observers in North America reported about 190 positive observations for 106 asteroid occultation events. For several asteroids, this included observations with multiple chords. For two events, an inversion model was available. An occultation by 16 Psyche on 2010 August 21 yielded a best-fit ellipse of 235.4 x 230.4 km. On 2010 December 24, an occultation by 93 Minerva produced a best-fit ellipse of 179.4 x 133.4 km. An occultation by 96 Aegle on 2010 October 29 yielded a best-fit ellipse of 124.9 x 88.0 km. An occultation by 105 Artemis on 2010 June 24 showed a best-fit ellipse of 125.0 x 92.0 km. An occultation by 375 Ursula on 2010 December 4 produced a best-fit ellipse of 125.0 km x 135.0 km. Of note are two events not summarized in this article. On 2010 August 31, an occultation by 695 Bella yielded a new double star. That event will be summarized in the JDSO. Finally, on 2010 April 6, an occultation of zeta Ophiuchi by 824 Anastasia was observed by 65 observers at 69 locations. Unfortunately a large shift in the path yielded only 4 chords. Results of that event, and all the events mentioned here, can be found on the North American Asteroidal Occultation Results web page.

Lightcurves for 1965 van de Kamp and 4971 Hoshinohiroba
Pages 204-205
Hayes-Gehrke, Melissa A.; Fromm, Tim; Junghans, Paige; Lochan, Ivan; Murphy, Sean
2011MPBu...38..204H    Download PDF

Asteroids 1965 van de Kamp and 4971 Hoshinohiroba were observed in 2011 February in order to create lightcurves. We found no discernible rotation period for 1965 van de Kamp with some suggestion it may be longer than 36 hours. We find a synodic rotation period of 7.7 ± 0.1 h for 4971 Hoshinohiroba.

Lightcurve Photometry of 6670 Wallach
Pages 205
Pletikosa, Ivica; Cikota, Stefan; Rodriguez, Juan; Burwitz, Vadim
2011MPBu...38..205P    Download PDF

The main-belt asteroid 6670 Wallach was observed over 3 nights between February 05, 2011 and February 11, 2011 at the Observatorio Astronomico de Mallorca (620). From the collected data we determined a synodic rotation period of 4.08 ± 0.01 h and lightcurve amplitude of about 0.80 ± 0.15 mag.

The Lightcurve for 202 Chryseis
Pages 208-209
Stephens, Robert D.; Pilcher, Frederick; Hamanowa, Hiromi; Hamanowa, Hiroko; Ferrero, Andrea
2011MPBu...38..208S    Download PDF

The main-belt asteroid 202 Chryseis was observed 2011 January ñ February by four observers with widely separated longitudes. The derived lightcurve has a synodic period of 23.670 ± 0.001 h and amplitude of 0.20 ± 0.02 mag.

Lightcurve Analysis of (8639) 1991 GR
Pages 209-210
Warner, Brian D.; Coley, Daniel
2011MPBu...38..209W    Download PDF

CCD photometry observations of the Eunomia member asteroid (8369) 1991 GR were made at the Palmer Divide Observatory and Center for Solar System Studies in 2011 March. Analysis using a single period search found a synodic period of 2.7368 ± 0.0001 h and lightcurve amplitude of 0.24 ± 0.02 mag. A dual-period search found a weak secondary period (assuming a bimodal lightcurve) of 49.24 ± 0.16 h. Subtracting this period noticeably improved the RMS fit of the short-period component.

Asteroids Observed from GMARS and Sanana Observatories: 2011 April - June
Pages 211-212
Stephens, Robert D.
2011MPBu...38..211S    Download PDF

Lightcurves of four asteroids were obtained from Santana Observatory and Goat Mountain Astronomical Research Station (GMARS) from 2011 April to June: 948 Jucunda, 1183 Jutta, 1775 Zimmerwald and 3492 Petra-Pepi.

The Curse of Sisyphus
Pages 212-213
Stephens, Robert D.; French, Linda, M.; Warner, Brian D.; Wasserman, Lawrence H.
2011MPBu...38..212S    Download PDF

Analysis of CCD photometry observations in mid-2011 of the suspected binary asteroid 1866 Sisyphus made at Lowell Observatory, Goat Mountain Astronomical Research Station (GMARS), and Palmer Divide Observatory (PDO) found two low amplitude periods of 2.40 h and 25.25 h. The shorter period is similar to that previously reported. The longer period may be due to the suspected satellite but, given the lack of mutual events (occultations and/or eclipses), the evidence is not conclusive.

Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Oakley Southern Observatory: 2011 January thru April
Pages 214-217
Ditteon, Richard; West, Josh
2011MPBu...38..214D    Download PDF

Photometric data for 23 asteroids were collected over 26 nights of observing during 2011 January thru 2011 April at the Oakley Southern Sky Observatory. The asteroids were: 437 Rhodia, 930 Westphalia, 948 Jucunda, 1129 Neujmina, 1315 Bronislawa, 1377 Roberbauxa, 1598 Paloque, 1716 Peter, 2107 Ilmari, 2108 Otto Schmidt, 2233 Kuznetsov, 2290 Helffrich, 3001 Michelangelo, 3065 Sarahill, 4175 Billbaum, 4493 Naitomitsu, 6505 Muzzio, 6511 Furmanov, 7145 Linzexu, (7151) 1971 SX3, (17129) 1999 JM78, (18835) 1999 NK56, and 52266 Van Flandern.

Lightcurve Analysis of Five Taxonomic A-class Asteroids
Pages 218-220
Lucas, Michael P.; Ryan, Jeffrey G.; Fauerbach, Michael; Grasso, Salvatore
2011MPBu...38..218L    Download PDF

We report lightcurve rotational periods for five taxonomic A-class asteroids observed at the Evelyn L. Egan Observatory: 246 Asporina, 289 Nenetta, 446 Aeternitas, 1600 Vyssotsky, and the Mars-crosser 1951 Lick.

Call for Lightcurves: Fast Flyby of Near-Earth Asteroid 2005 YU55
Pages 220
Moskovitz, Nicholas; Warner, Brian D.
2011MPBu...38..220M    Download PDF

As noted in the Photometry Opportunities article (this issue), on November 8, 2011 at 23:28 UT the approximately 400-meter Ctype asteroid 2005 YU55 will pass inside the Moonís orbit at 0.0022 AU (85% of the Earth-Moon distance) and reach a brightness of V~11. Such an encounter for an asteroid of this size occurs but once every few decades and thus enables a host of exciting and novel scientific investigations.

Lightcurve Analysis of Asteroids from Leura and Kingsgrove Observatory for the Second Half of 2009 and 2010
Pages 221-223
Oey, Julian
2011MPBu...38..221O    Download PDF

Photometric observations of the following asteroids were made from both Kingsgrove and Leura Observatories for the remaining half of 2009 and 2010: 1194 Aletta (20.390 ± 0.007 h); 1685 Toro (10.203 ± 0.003 h); 2897 Ole Romer (2.6004 ± 0.0002 h); 4283 Stoffler (133 ± 1 h); 6961 Ashitaka (3.1461 ± 0.0002 h); (10357) 1993 SL3 (2.763 ± 0.002 h); (14133) 1998 RJ17 (5.24009 ± 0.00008 h); (55760) 1992 BL1 (8.0813 ± 0.0004 h); (131702) 2001 YZ3 (4.920 ± 0.004 h); and 2001 FE90 (0.47713 ± 0.00009 h).

Lightcurve Determination of 3151 Talbot and 4666 Dietz
Pages 223-224
Ferrero, Andrea
2011MPBu...38..223F    Download PDF

CCD photometry observations of 3151 Talbot and 4666 Dietz were obtained at the Bigmuskie Observatory, Italy, during 2011 June and July. Analysis found a rotation period of 19.49 ± 0.01 h for 3151 Talbot and a period of 2.953 ± 0.003 h for 4666 Dietz.

Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2011 October-December
Pages 224-229
Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Pravec, Petr; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.
2011MPBu...38..224W    Download PDF

We present lists of asteroid photometry opportunities for objects reaching a favorable apparition and having no or poorly-defined lightcurve parameters. Additional data on these objects will help with shape and spin axis modeling via lightcurve inversion. We also include lists of objects that will be the target of radar observations. Lightcurves for these objects can help constrain pole solutions and/or remove rotation period ambiguities that might not come from using radar data alone.

Rotation Period Determination for 531 Zerlina
Pages 206
Pilcher, Frederick; Brinsfield, James W.
2011MPBu...38Q.206P    Download PDF

The synodic rotation period of 531 Zerlina is found to be 16.706 ± 0.001 hours with lightcurve amplitude varying from 0.70 ± 0.05 to 0.55 ± 0.04 magnitudes.

53 Kalypso, a Difficult Asteroid
Pages 206-208
Pilcher, Frederick
2011MPBu...38R.206P    Download PDF

Previous observations of 53 Kalypso have not resolved a rotation period ambiguity between near 9.035 hours and twice that value. New observations very strongly support the 9.035 hour period, with amplitude 0.10 magnitudes and 3 unequal maxima and minima per cycle in the interval 2011 April-July.


copyright©2017 Brian D. Warner. Funding to support this web site is provided by NASA grant NSSC 80NSSC18K0851