The Minor Planet Bulletin
BULLETIN OF THE MINOR PLANETS SECTION OF THE ASSOCIATION OF LUNAR AND PLANETARY OBSERVERS


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The Minor Planet Bulletin is the journal for almost all amateurs and even some professionals for publishing asteroid photometry results, including lightcurves, H-G parameters, color indexes, and shape/spin axis models. It is considered to be a refereed journal by the SAO/NASA ADS. All MPB papers are indexed in the ADS.

Print subscriptions are no longer available to individuals. Institutions (e.g., college libraries) can still obtain print copies via a special subscription. See details in MPB 37-4 or contact the editor, Richard Binzel.

Annual voluntary contributions of $5.00 or more in support of the publication are welcome.
Please send a check, drawn on a U.S. bank and payable in U.S. funds, to "Minor Planet Bulletin" and send it to:

Derald D. Nye
Minor Planet Bulletin
10385 E. Observatory Drive
Corona de Tucson, AZ 85641-2309


Authors Guide and Word Templates   (v.2.7: updated 2019 March 4)
Please read this updated guide since there are a number of changes from previous guides.
The ZIP file contains the Authors Guide PDF as well as a "starter" paper in Word 97 (DOT) and Word 2007+ (DOTX).

Cumulative Index to Volumes 1-45
Cumulative Asteroid Lightcurve Index (Volumes 1 through 46-2)

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Issues for the upcoming quarter-year are released on about the 21st of March, June, September, and December. Full issues and individual papers from vol 1 (1973) to present are available via links on this page.

Important: If the ADS bibcode and "Download PDF" links are missing for the latest issue, it is because the ADS has not processed the files. The links will be made available after the ADS processes the files.
If the "Download PDF" link is visible and there is no PDF available, clicking the link will download an arbitrary page. We are working with ADS to make sure all papers are available and, if not, being able to diasable the link. The "Download Full Issue" link does retrieve the correct file.

Vol 1-7 run Jul-Jun. Vol 8-present run Jan-Dec. Only papers indexed in the ADS are included. Earlier volumes often contain more papers than listed here. It's recommended to download the full issue in vol 1-9.

Volume 46 (2019)

Volume 45 (2018)

Volume 44 (2017)

Volume 43 (2016)

Volume 42 (2015)

Volume 41 (2014)

Volume 40 (2013)

Volume 39 (2012)

Volume 38 (2011)

Volume 37 (2010)

Volume 36 (2009)

Volume 35 (2008)

Volume 34 (2007)

Volume 33 (2006)

Volume 32 (2005)

Volume 31 (2004)

Volume 30 (2003)

Volume 29 (2002)

Volume 28 (2001)

Volume 27 (2000)

Volume 26 (1999)

Volume 25 (1998)

Volume 24 (1997)

Volume 23 (1996)

Volume 22 (1995)

Volume 21 (1994)

Volume 20 (1993)

Volume 19 (1992)

Volume 18 (1991)

Volume 17 (1990)

Volume 16 (1989)

Volume 15 (1988)

Volume 14 (1987)

Volume 13 (1986)

Volume 12 (1985)

Volume 11 (1984)

Volume 10 (1983)

Volume 9 (1982)

Volume 8 (1981)

Volume 7 (1980)

Volumes 6-7 (1979)

Volumes 5-6 (1978)

Volumes 4-5 (1977)
    
    
    
    

Volumes 3-4 (1976)

Volumes 2-3 (1975)

Volumes 1-2 (1974)

Volume 1 (1973)

  
Issue 5-2 (1977 Oct-Dec)
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Show abstracts

Minor Planet Rotation Report, June-December 1976
Pages 15-16
Porter, Alain C.; Wallentine, Derek
1977MPBu....5...15P    Download PDF

The A.L.P.O. Minor Planets Section received fewer light curves of asteroids in the latter half of 1975, a distinct disappointment in view of the better performance in 1975 and early 1975 (cf, MPB 3, 47-50).

Possible Observation of a Satellite of a Minor Planet
Pages 16-17
Dunham, David W.; Maley, Paul D.
1977MPBu....5...16D    Download PDF

With all of the publicity about the rings of Uranus discovered during an occultation of a faint star by the planet during 1977 march 10, we hope that astronomers will not overlook observations of another remarkable occultation which took place five days earlier. This was the occultation of 3.6 magnitude gamma Ceti A by 6 Hebe, observed from locations in and near Mexico City (see IAU Circular 3040 and 3047). This is the first time that an occultation of a star by one of the larger minor planets has been observed from more than one station, The preliminary reports, all by visual observers, seem to be consistent with a diameter for Hebe of about 200 km, which is also the value obtained by modern radiometric and polarimetric methods.

Precise Positions of Minor Planets
Pages 17-19
Pilcher, Frederick
1977MPBu....5...17P    Download PDF

Precise and semi-precise photographic and micrometric positions of minor planets by Section members are reported, along with policy for future submissions.


copyright©2017 Brian D. Warner. Funding to support this web site is provided by NASA grant NSSC 80NSSC18K0851