The Minor Planet Bulletin
BULLETIN OF THE MINOR PLANETS SECTION OF THE ASSOCIATION OF LUNAR AND PLANETARY OBSERVERS


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The Minor Planet Bulletin is the journal for almost all amateurs and even some professionals for publishing asteroid photometry results, including lightcurves, H-G parameters, color indexes, and shape/spin axis models. It is considered to be a refereed journal by the SAO/NASA ADS. All MPB papers are indexed in the ADS.

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Authors Guide and Word Templates   (v.2.8: updated 2019 June 16)
The ZIP file contains the Authors Guide PDF as well as a "starter" paper in Word 97 (DOT) and Word 2007+ (DOTX).
Please read this updated guide since there are a number of changes from previous guides.
  • The Pts column is no longer required and has been removed from the template for the standard table
    to allow more room for the other columns.
  • The phase column should have only two values: for the first and last date in the range.
    If the phase reaches an extrema between those dates, put an asterisk before the first value. For example,
       *7.2,13.7.
  • Use semicolons to separate names in the references section. For example:
       Smith, J.J.; Jones, A.A. (2019).
    This also applies if using several references to the same author in the text. For example:
    "This asteroid was observed at three previous apparitions (Jones, 2015; 2017; 2018)..."

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Issue 46-3 (2019 Jul-Sep)
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Rotation Period for 2670 Chuvashia
Pages 227-228
Percy, Stephen C.

CCD photometric observations of the outer main-belt asteroid 2670 Chuvashia performed by the author over two nights on 2019 January 28 and 30. The rotation period was found to be 3.846 ± 0.002 h with a lightcurve amplitude of 0.15 ± 0.02 mag.

Rotation Period Determination of 5889 Mickiewicz and 13063 Purifoy
Pages 229-230
Ergashev, K. E. ; Ehgamberdiyev, Sh. A.; Burkhonov, O. A.; Turayev, Y. Sh.; Yoshida, Fumi

The main-belt asteroids, 5889 Mickiewicz and 13063 Purifoy were observed at Maidanak astronomical observatory, the Ulugh Beg Astronomical Institute, Uzbek Academy of Sciences from May 21 to June 27 in 2017 and July 10 to August 21 in 2018, respectively. Based on the lightcurve analysis of each asteroid, a synodic rotation period for 5889 Mickiewicz was 6.1412 ± 0.0543 hour (0.25524 ± 0.25814 day) and its light curve amplitude was 0.369 ± 0.054 mag, and a synodic rotation period of asteroid 13063 Purifoy was 10.3435 ± 0.2451 hour and its lightcurve amplitude was 0.858 ± 0.097 mag.

Photometric Observations Of Main-Belt Asteroids 917 Lyka, 5703 Hevelius, (6638) 1989 CA, and 8073 Johnharmon
Pages 230-232
Brincat, Stephen M.; Galdies, Charles; Stone, Geoff; Grech, Winston

Photometric observations of four main-belt asteroids were obtained from October 26 to December 05, 2018 from Malta and the United States in order to update or determine their synodic rotation periods. We provide lightcurves for 917 Lyka, 5703 Hevelius, (6638) 1989 CA and 8073 Johnharmon.

Asteroid Photometry at the Carl Sagan Observatory of Universidad De Sonora During 2017
Pages 233-234
Contreras, M. E.; Olguín, L.; Loera-González, P.; Saucedo, J. C.; Estrada-Dorado, S.; López-López, A.; Medina, C. A.; Ramírez, J. C.; Núñez-López, R.; Sada, Pedro V.

We present photometric lightcurves and rotation period values for three asteroids, namely 4404 Enirac (2.9986 ± 0.0003 h), 5976 Kalatajean (4.5543 ± 0.0001 h) and 9671 Hemera (2.5323 ± 0.0005 h). Observations were carried out at the Carl Sagan Observatory (OCS) of the Universidad de Sonora. In the case of 9671 Hemera we have not found any clear evidence of binarity.

Distribution of Minor Planet Numbers vs Cumulative Number Observed
Pages 235
Salthouse, Andrew

The author finds that as the cumulative number of minor planets observed increases, the median value of the observed minor planet numbers also increases, in roughly linear fashion. He finds that specific percentage points of the minor planet number distribution increase in proportion to the total number observed.

Lightcurve Analysis of Asteroids 131 Vala, 1184 Gaea, 7145 Linzexu, and 26355 Grueber
Pages 236-237
Fauerbach, Michael; Fauerbach, Matthew

Photometric observations of 4 main-belt asteroids were obtained on four nights between 2018 November 26 and 2018 December 19. We derived the following rotational periods: 131 Vala 5.182 ± 0.001 h; 1184 Gaea 2.873 ± 0.001 h; 7145 Linzexu 2.905 ± 0.001 h and 26355 Grueber 4.539 ± 0.001 h.

Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Asteroid Photometric Survey (NEAPS): Paper 3.
Pages 238-265
Skiff, Brian A.; McLelland, Kyle P.; Sanborn, Jason J.; Pravec, Petr; Koehn, Bruce W.

Revised and new photometry is presented for 72 asteroids using telescopes at Lowell Observatory since 2008. The data are reduced as closely as possible to Sloan r´ magnitudes.

Rotation Period for 2053 Nuki
Pages 265-266
Percy, Stephen C.

CCD photometric observations of the outer main-belt asteroid 2053 Nuki were made by the author over seven nights between 2019 February 4-21. The rotation period was found to be 11.604 ± 0.001 h with a lightcurve amplitude of 0.40 ± 0.05 mag.

Rotation Period Determination for 449 Hamburga
Pages 267
Pilcher, Frederick; Franco, Lorenzo; Marchini, Alessandro

Twenty-three sessions on 449 Hamburga 2018 Dec. 3 – 2019 Feb. 12 provide a good fit to a synodic rotation period of 36.516 ± 0.001 hours with amplitude 0.06 ± 0.01 magnitudes and three unequal maxima and minima per rotational cycle.

Rotation Period for (33143) 1998 DJ7, (57735) 2001 UQ159, and (73308) 2002 JJ74
Pages 268-269
Davalos, J. A. G.; Silva, J. S.; Tamayo, F. J.; Alvarez, F. I.

The asteroids (33143) 1998 DJ7, (57735) 2001 UQ159, and (73308) 2002 JJ74 were observed in 2017 March, 2018 April, and 2018 March, respectively. The possible synodic periods were found to be 11.65 h, 16.26 h, and 1.57 h, respectively.

Spin Axis and Shape Model for 1117 Reginita
Pages 269-271
Franco, Lorenzo; Marchini, Alessandro; Galdies, Charles; Brincat, Stephen M.; Grech, Winston

We present shape and spin axis model for main-belt asteroid 1117 Reginita. The model was achieved with the lightcurve inversion process using combined dense photometric data acquired from nine apparitions between 2003-2018 and sparse data from USNO Flagstaff. Analysis of the resulting data found a sidereal period P = 2.946472 ± 0.000002 hours and two mirrored pole solutions at (l = 0°, b = 43°) and (l = 174°, b = 47°) with an uncertainty of ± 5 degrees.

Lightcurve Analysis of Ten Asteroids
Pages 272-274
Owings, Larry E.

Lightcurves for ten main-belt asteroids were obtained at the Barnes Ridge Observatory from 2018 May 30 through 2018 November 18. Synodic rotation periods and amplitudes are found for nine main-belt asteroids. The nine are 1229 Tilia: 7.0354 h, 0.28 mag; 2206 Gabrova: 5.076 h, 0.25 mag; 2399 Terradas: 15.234 h, 0.058 mag; 3072 Vilnius: 7.1940 h, 0.56 mag; 3677 Magnusson: 9.4660 h, 0.72 mag; 3788 Steyaert: 18.467 h. 0.57 mag; 7230 Lutz: 5.6960 h 0.25 mag; 10358 Kirchhoff: 7.4084 h, 0.36 mag; (11650) 1997 CN: 7.7246 h, 0.33 mag; (26377) 1999 FH4: 6.7755 h, 0.41 mag.

Lightcurve Analysis of Minor Planets Observed at the Oakley Southern Sky Observatory: 2018 May–June
Pages 275-276
Ditteon, Richard; Lin, Weichang; Sheerin, Margaret

During 2018 May and June, we observed twelve minor planets from the Oakley Southern Sky Observatory. The targets were 1032 Pafuri, 2071 Nadezhda, 2206 Gabrova, 2685 Masursky, 3214 Makarenko, 3403 Tammy, 4990 Trombka, 5547 Acadiau, (7834) 1993 JL, 10358 Kirchhoff, (11200) 1999 CV121, and (33903) 2000 KH68.

Rotational Period Determination for Asteroids 1802 Zhang Heng and (110767) 2001 UB25
Pages 277-278
Mannucci, Massimiliano; Montigiani, Nico

CCD photometric observations of two main-belt asteroids were obtained in order to measure their rotation period. These measures were performed during two different nights on 6/1/2019 and 8/3/2019, using the instrumentation available at the Osservatorio Astronomico Margherita Hack located on the hills near Florence (Italy).

Trappist Lightcurves of Main-Belt Asteroids 31 Euphrosyne, 41 Daphne, and 89 Julia
Pages 278-279
Ferrais, Marin; Jehin, Emmanuël; Manfroid, Jean; Moulane, Youssef; Pozuelos, Francisco J.; Gillon, Michaël; Benkhaldoun, Zouhair

Densely sampled lightcurves of three large main-belt asteroids were obtained with the TRAPPIST-South (TS) and TRAPPIST-North (TN) telescopes from 2017 September to 2018 July. We found their synodic rotation periods and amplitudes to be: 31 Euphrosyne, 5.5312 ± 0.0007 h and 0.07 mag; 41 Daphne, 5.9912 ± 0.0028 h and 0.18 mag; and 89 Julia, 11.3844 ± 0.0002 h and 0.19 mag. All data have been submitted to the ALCDEF database.

Lightcurve Analysis of Minor Planets Observed at the Oakley Southern Sky Observatory: 2018 August–September
Pages 280-282
Ditteon, Richard; Johnson, Daniel; Lin, Weichang; Wang, Zibo; Zhao, Boyan

During 2018 August and September, we targeted seventeen minor planets for CCD photometric observations using the Oakley Southern Sky Observatory: 1359 Prieska, 1504 Lappeenranta, 2373 Immo, 3197 Weissman, 3248 Farinella, 3330 Gantrisch, 3819 Robinson, 3901 Nanjingdaxue, 4286 Rubtsov, 6086 Vrchlicky, 7291 Hyakutake, 7497 Guangcaishiye, (10565) 1994 AT1, (14874) 1990 US4, (16880) 1998 BW11, (17989) 1999 JE64, and (52402) 1993 TL.

Results of the First Semester of the 2018 Mexican Asteroid Photometry Campaign
Pages 283-285
Loera-González, Pablo; Olguín, Lorenzo; Contreras, María E.; Saucedo Morales, Julio; Schuster, William; Sada, Pedro V.

We report results from the first half of the 2018 Mexican Photometry Campaign. This period consisted of a total of 42 observing nights distributed on three observatories. From these data we have obtained lightcurves and synodic rotational periods for 6 asteroids. 1491 Balduinus resulted in a period of P = 15.3044 ± 0.0057 hr; 1856 Ružena, P = 5.957 ± 0.001 hr; 3394 Banno P = 7.344 ± 0.0002 hr; 3877 Braes P = 5.8155 ± 0.0005 hr; 7430 Kogure, P = 17.998 ± 0.076 hr; and for 2001 KB67, P = 6.357 ± 0.0012 hr.

Rotation Period of Asteroid 1394 Algoa
Pages 286
Aimar, Fabrizio; Ghio, Giorgio

During 2019 March we made five observing sessions of 1394 Algoa from our very light-polluted urban site in northern Italy. Despite this severe limit, our survey confirms previous results with an estimated period P = 2.768 ± 0.001 h and amplitude A = 0.21 ± 0.05 mag.

Lightcurves of Twelve Main-Belt Minor Planets
Pages 287-292
Polakis, Tom

Synodic rotation periods were determined for twelve main-belt asteroids: 394 Burdigala, 399.8 ± 0.7 h; 464 Megaira, 12.860 ± 0.012 h; 858 El Djezair, 14.830 ± 0.015 h; 1269 Rollandia, 28.277 ± 0.017 h; 1585 Union, 12.798 ± 0.005 h; 1603 Neva, 6.423 ± 0.002 h; 1614 Goldschmidt, 16.540 ± 0.013 h; 1720 Niels, 250.9 ± 0.9 h; 2162 Anhui, 8.090 ± 0.005 h; 3040 Kozai, 4.512 ± 0.008 h; 5321 Jagras, 2.6370 ± 0.0004 h; and (18736) 1998 NU, 2.4755 ± 0.0002 h. All the data have been submitted to the ALCDEF database.

A Re-Evaluation of Asteroid 4181 Kivi
Pages 292
Rowe, Basil

Asteroid 4181 Kivi was reported by the author (Rowe, 2019) as having a rotational period of 89.1 h and a monomodal lightcurve; this was incorrect. The reported period should be 178.2 h.

Lightcurve and Period Determination for Asteroid 4148 Mccartney
Pages 293-294
Odden, Caroline; Abruzzese, Zachary; Beckwith, Ryan; Chandran, Rhea; El Alam, Zayd; Glover, Erik; Kacergis, Joseph; Lazaro Carrasco, Ines; Solomon, Hugo; Wang, Justin; Klinglesmith, Dan; Goodwrench, Zachery; Pilcher, Frederick

Photometric observations for main-belt asteroid 4148 McCartney were taken from 2019 February 01 to 2019 February 26. The rotational period for this asteroid is determined to be 20.748 ± .003 hours, with amplitude 0.16 ± 0.05 mag.

Lightcurve Analysis of Hilda Asteroids at the Center for Solar System Studies: 2019 January-March
Pages 294-297
Warner, Brian D.; Stephens, Robert D.

CCD photometric observations of three Hilda asteroids were made at the Center for Solar System Studies (CS3) from 2019 January-March. For 1038 Tuckia, the period solution was ambiguous at either P = 18.020 h, amplitude 0.22 mag or P = 14.401 h, amplitude 0.20 mag. For 2246 Bowell, the analysis found P = 4.997 and amplitude 0.46 mag. For 4317 Garibaldi, we found a dual-period solution with P1 = 17.843 or 8.92 h and P2 = 11.426 h. The shorter value for P1 is similar to previously reported results but this is the first time a true dual-period solution, i.e., not an ambiguous single period solution, has been reported.

Main-Belt Asteroids Observed from CS3: 2019 January - March
Pages 298-301
Stephens, Robert D.; Warner, Brian D.

CCD photometric observations of 10 main-belt asteroids were obtained from the Center for Solar System Studies from 2019 January to March. In light of recent period analysis, images of 2120 Tyumenia obtained in 2004 were re-examined. The resulting analysis found a period of 17.515 h, which is consistent with the recent results.

Near-Earth Asteroid (152931) 2000 EA107: A Probable Binary
Pages 302-303
Stephens, Robert D.; Warner, Brian D.

CCD photometric observations of the near-Earth asteroid (152931) 2000 EA107 were made in 2019 March and April at the Center for Solar System Studies (CS3). Analysis of the data found that the asteroid is likely a binary. The primary period is P1 = 4.1367 ± 0.0002 h with a lightcurve amplitude of A1 = 0.29 ± 0.02 mag. The secondary period is P2 = 16.079 ± 0.006 h with a lightcurve amplitude of A2 = 0.16 ± 0.01 mag. No mutual events (occultations and/or eclipses) were seen to confirm the presence of a satellite.

Near-Earth Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Center for Solar System Studies: 2019 January-April
Pages 304-314
Warner, Brian D.; Stephens, Robert D.

Lightcurves for 24 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) obtained at the Center for Solar System Studies (CS3) from 2019 January-April were analyzed for rotation period, peakto- peak amplitude, and signs of satellites or tumbling. Two asteroids, (381677) 2009 BJ81 and (454177) 2013 GJ35, were found to have two periods that make them additional candidates for the class of very wide binary asteroids. Another object with two periods was (18736) 1998 NU, 2.4753 h and 11.95 h. The second period solution is weak but does not seem to be systematic in nature. Potential tumblers include (88254) 2001 FM129, (90403) 2003 YE45, and 2006 SK134.

Lightcurve Analysis of L5 Trojan Asteriods at the Center for Solar System Studies: 2019 January to March
Pages 315-317
Stephens, Robert D.; Warner, Brian D.

Lightcurves for four L5 Jovian Trojan asteroids were obtained at the Center for Solar System Studies (CS3) from 2019 January to March. The suspected binary Trojan, 2207 Antenor was observed again and a single attenuation event was detected.

Lightcurves of 153 Hilda at Large Phase Angles
Pages 318-319
Pilcher, Frederick; Benishek, Vladimir

At phase angle 12.5 degrees the synodic rotation period and amplitude of 153 Hilda are 5.9582 ± 0.003 hours, 0.23 ± 0.02 magnitudes, respectively. An H-G plot in the R magnitude system is also presented with HR = 7.457 ± 0.040 and GR = 0.108 ± 0.051. Using an assumed V-R = 0.376 gives H = 7.833 with G = 0.108.

Low Phase Angle Observations of Asteroid 291 Alice
Pages 319-320
Ruthroff, John

A low phase angle lightcurve of Flora family asteroid 291 Alice was obtained at Shadowbox Observatory (H60) on 2019-03-26 UT. Period results are consistent with previous observations, P = 4.313 h. Phase angle was 0.8 degrees.

The NEA Fast Rotator 2019 EA2
Pages 321
Carbognani, Albino; Buzzi, Luca

We report on the results of photometric observations of the near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 2019 EA2. The synodic rotation period is 0.02882 ± 0.00003 h, with a lightcurve amplitude of 0.57 ± 0.18 mag.

General Report of Position Observations by the Alpo Minor Planets Section for the Year 2018
Pages 322-329
Pilcher, Frederick

Observations of positions of minor planets by members of the Minor Planets Section in calendar year 2018 are summarized.

Etscorn Lightcurves: January 2019 - April 2019
Pages 329-330
Klinglesmith, Daniel A. III; Goodwrench, Zackary

In the first quarter of 2019 we obtained the synodic period for 4 asteroids: 1435 Garlena, 2727 Paton, (7520) 1190 BV and (18348) 1990 BM1.

Lightcurve Analysis and Rotation Period for (37652) 1994 JS1
Pages 331
Noschese, Alfonso; Vecchione, Antonio; Catapano, Antonio

From 2019 March 8-23, CCD images were taken with the aim to measure the rotation period of (37652) 1994 JS1. The data analysis gives a light curve with a rotation period of 17.4501 ± 0.0014 hours.

Physical Properties of Hilda Binary Asteroid Candidates
Pages 332-334
Williamson, B.; Sonnett, S.; Witry, J.; Chatelain, J.; Grav, T.; Reddy, V.; Lejoly, C.; Kramer, E.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Gritsevich, M.; Bauer, J.

We determine the rotation periods, lightcurve amplitudes, and H-G parameters for three potentially binary Hilda asteroids. We measured a rotation period of 40.06 ± 0.06 h, amplitude of 0.82 ± 0.02 mag, Hr’ = 11.74 ± 0.01 mag, and Gr’ = 0.73 ± 0.07 for 3923 Radzievskij. For (307321) 2002 QA123, we measure a rotation period of 26.502 ± 0.006 h, an amplitude of 0.79 ± 0.06 mag, HR = 15.12 ± 0.01 mag, and GR = 0.71 ± 0.04. For (445068) 2008 SE268, we determine a rotation period of 7.903 ± 0.003 h and amplitude of 1.1 mag, with HR = 15.40 ± 0.03 mag and GR = 0.44 ± 0.14.

Rotation Properties of Large-Amplitude Hilda Asteroids
Pages 335-337
Witry, J.; Sonnett, S.; Williamson, B.; Chatelain, J.; Grav, T.; Reddy, V.; Lejoly, C.; Kramer, E.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Gritsevich, M.; Bauer, J.

Lightcurve data for 3 potential binary asteroids belonging to the Hilda population were obtained from 2015 to 2018. For (46629) 1994 PS38, we obtained two epochs of coverage, rendering consistent rotation solutions of 8.39 ± 0.01 h (1st epoch in 2015) and 8.41 ± 0.02 h (2nd epoch in 2018), with amplitudes of 0.86 ± 0.05 R-mag and 0.90 ± 0.04 r’-mag, respectively. We obtain best-fit rotation periods of 12.228 ± 0.008 h with an amplitude of 0.80 ± 0.04 R-mag for (247405) 2002 CU1, and 8.44 ± 0.01 h with an amplitude of 0.74 ± 0.06 R-mag for (250139) 2002 RK68.

Rotation Period Determination for the Asteroids 3329 Golay and (37652) 1994 JS1
Pages 338-339
Marchini, Alessandro; Papini, Riccardo; Banfi, Massimo; Salvaggio, Fabio; Franco, Lorenzo

CCD photometric observations of two main-belt asteroids were conducted from the Astronomical Observatory of the University of Siena and the Wild Boar Remote Observatory, both located in Italy, in order to determine their synodic rotation periods. For 3329 Golay we found a period of 7.129 ± 0.003 h and lightcurve amplitude of 0.57 ± 0.03 mag; for (37652) 1994 JS1 we found a period of 17.459 ± 0.002 h and lightcurve amplitude of 0.40 ± 0.03 mag.

Lightcurve and Rotation Period Determination for 2496 Fernandus, 2727 Paton, and 69971 Tanzi
Pages 340-341
Salvaggio, Fabio; Marchini, Alessandro; Papini, Riccardo; Banfi, Massimo

Photometric observations of the main-belt asteroids 2496 Fernandus, 2727 Paton, and 69971 Tanzi were made by the authors from 2019 January 3 to April 5. Analysis found bimodal lightcurves for each one. The most likely synodic periods are: 2496 Fernandus, 2.807 ± 0.001 h; 2727 Paton, 5.324 ± 0.001 h; and 69971 Tanzi, 32.540 ± 0.009 h.

Synodic Rotation Periods and Lightcurves for 13 Asteroids: 2018 October - 2019 March
Pages 341-345
Benishek, Vladimir

Results on lightcurve and synodic rotation period determinations for 13 asteroids from data collected at Sopot Astronomical Observatory in the time span 2018 October - 2019 March are presented.

Asteroid Photometry from the Preston Gott Observatory
Pages 346-349
Clark, Maurice

Asteroid period and amplitude results obtained at the Preston Gott Observatory during 2018 June and in previous years are presented.

Lightcurves for 224 Oceana, 359 Georgia, 1453 Fennia and 1717 Arlon
Pages 350-352
Franco, Lorenzo; Marchini, Alessandro; Battista Casalnuovo, Giovanni; Chinaglia, Benedetto; Baj, Giorgio; Scarfi, Giulio; Galli, Gianni; Bacci, Paolo; Maestripieri, Martina; Valvasori, Adriano; Caselli, Catia; Punzo, Pierluigi; Montigiani, Nico; Mannucci, Massimiliano; Bachini, Mauro; Succi, Giacomo; Bacci, Roberto

Photometric observations of four main-belt asteroids were made in order to acquire lightcurves for shape/spin axis models. The synodic period and lightcurve amplitude were found for: 224 Oceana: 9.404 ± 0.001 h, 0.10 mag; 359 Georgia: 5.5329 ± 0.0001 h, 0.14 mag.; 1453 Fennia: 4.4120 ± 0.0002 h, 0.14 mag; and 1717 Arlon: 5.1448 ± 0.0004 h, 0.10 mag. We also confirmed previous discoveries of a satellite for 1453 Fennia and 1717 Arlon.

Lightcurve Analysis of 9 Asteroids from RMS Observatory
Pages 353-356
Rowe, Basil

CCD images of 9 asteroids were taken from 2018 August 5 to 2019 January 31 for the purpose of determining their synodic rotation periods. The asteroids were: 2678 Aavasaksa, 2727 Paton, 3769 Arthurmiller, 5703 Hevelius, 6801 Strekov, 7954 Kitao, 16198 Buzios, (17109) 1999JF52, and (26377) 1999 FH4.

Rotation Period Determination for 3157 Novikov - Addendum
Pages 357
Marchini, Alessandro; Papini, Riccardo; Banfi, Massimo; Salvaggio, Fabio; Bachini, Mauro; Galdies, Charles; Brincat, Stephen M.

New analysis of data we obtained for 3157 Novikov leads to a revised synodic period of 14.930 ± 0.001 h and lightcurve amplitude of 0.27 ± 0.03 mag.

New Photometry of the Hungaria Asteroid 1600 Vyssotsky in the 2019 Apparition
Pages 358-359
Benishek, Vladimir; Pilcher, Frederick; Pray, Donald P.

A systematic photometric monitoring of the Hungaria asteroid 1600 Vyssotsky was carried out from the three observatories in Europe and North America in 2019 February - April. Although early data hinted at the possibility of the existence of a satellite, further systematic observations ruled out such a possibility.

Rotation Period Determinations for 58 Concordia, 384 Burdigala, 464 Megaira, 488 Kreusa, and 491 Carina
Pages 360-363
Pilcher, Frederick

Synodic rotation periods and amplitudes are found for 58 Concordia 9.895 ± 0.002 hours, 0.10 ± 0.01 magnitudes with an irregular lightcurve; 384 Burdigala 404.9 ± 0.1 hours, 0.40 ± 0.05 magnitudes with no detected tumbling; 464 Megaira 12.879 ± 0.001 hours, 0.12 ± 0.01 magnitudes; 488 Kreusa 32.645 ± 0.001 hours, 0.12 ± 0.01 magnitudes; 491 Carina 14.836 ± 0.001 hours, 0.13 ± 0.01 magnitudes. For 384 Burdigala the color index is V-R = 0.48, at mid-light in the V photometric system H = 9.53 ± 0.05, G = 0.22 ± 0.05.

Lightcurve Analysis of Asteroid 2305 King
Pages 363-364
Odden, Caroline E.; Abruzzese, Zachary N.; Beckwith, Ryan M.; Chandran, Rhea J.; El Alam, Zayd; Glover, Erik W.; Kacergis, Joseph P.; Lazaro, Ines; Julia, Carrasco; Nyiha, Irura N.; Solomon, Hugo V.; Wang, Justin S.; Yu, Zhifei; Zhu, Julia

Photometric observations of outer main-belt asteroid 2305 King were made from the Phillips Academy Observatory from 2018 November 30 to 2019 January 15. The rotational period of the asteroid is determined to be 3.0368 ± 0.0005 h, with amplitude 0.19 ± 0.10 mag.

Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2019 July-September
Pages 365-371
Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A.M.

We present lists of asteroid photometry opportunities for objects reaching a favorable apparition and having either none or poorly-defined lightcurve parameters. Additional data on these objects will help with shape and spin axis modeling via lightcurve inversion. We also include lists of objects that will be the target of radar observations. Lightcurves for these objects can help constrain pole solutions and/or remove rotation period ambiguities that might not come from using radar data alone.

In This Issue
Pages 371-372
Warner, Brian D.

This list gives those asteroids in this issue for which physical observations (excluding astrometric only) were made. This includes lightcurves, color index, and H-G determinations, etc. In some cases, no specific results are reported due to a lack of or poor quality data. The page number is for the first page of the paper mentioning the asteroid. EP is the "go to page" value in the electronic version.


copyright©2017 Brian D. Warner. Funding to support this web site is provided by NASA grant NSSC 80NSSC18K0851